Keys Issues in Teaching and Learning for 2016

2016 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning Infographic

With a broad membership of over 350 institutions spanning a variety of Carnegie classifications, states, and several countries, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) is well aware that there’s significant power in community. This is why, for the past six years, ELI has surveyed its higher education community to determine key issues & opportunities in post-secondary teaching & learning.

ELI surveys every year the wildly complex landscape of teaching and learning. This year, over 900 of community members selected the most pressing issues to form a final list of 15. These key issues will serve as the framework, or focal points, for all of ELI’s discussions and programming throughout 2016. Here’s a listing of the Key Issues in Teaching & Learning for 2016 Infographic.

  1. Academic Transformation
  2. Faculty Development
  3. Assessment of Learning
  4. Online and Blended Learning
  5. Learning Analytics
  6. Learning Space Design
  7. Accessibility & Universal Design for Learning
  8. Open Educational Resources & Content
  9. Working with Emerging Technology
  10. Next Gen Digital Learning Environments (NGDLE) & Services
  11. Digital & Informational Literacies
  12. Adaptive Learning
  13. Mobile Learning
  14. Evaluating Tech-Based Instructional Innovations
  15. Evolution of the Profession

The high-resolution infographic is available here via Educause.

Infographic: Keeping Pace with the Changing Face of Online Learning

Over the past two decades the Internet has made it possible for anyone anywhere to pursue an affordable degree; for adults to continue their education in efforts to remain productive; and for universities to reach a greater number of people who want to learn. Infusing online learning into higher education provides educators with innovative ways to connect with students, wherever they are, and offers incredible, new career opportunities. This infographic by the Online Learning Consortium highlights a few of these changes.

OLC Infographic 2015

The History of Online Education Infographic

History of Online Education

Courtesy Affordable Online Colleges

10 Signs You Are a Tech-Savvy Teacher Infographic

10 Signs You Are a Tech Savvy Teacher Infographic

Becoming a tech-savvy teacher isn’t easy and it actually takes quite a long time. The 10 Signs You Are a Tech-Savvy Teacher Infographic helps you find out just how much technology has become integrated with your life by presenting a few of the many signs that show that you’re a plugged-in and connected educator.

The below are just a few of the many signs you’re a plugged-in and connected educator. What are some of the big signs we’ve missed? Share them with us down in the comments or by mentioning @DailyGenius on Twitter. We’ll be sure to retweet, share, and use your input for future graphics!

  1. Your students read your blog. Your students know that you share homework help, useful apps, your other favorite blogs, and a whole lot more on your teaching biog. They comment or at least monitor it to stay up to date.
  2. Your real professional development happens online. You know that the structured professional development that your school district performs is not really where you’re learning new skills. You turn to social media and online skill-building platforms to really enhance your skillset. Time to update the Linkedln profile!
  3. You’ve made an online PLN. Whether you call it a ‘professional’ or a ‘personal’ learning network is up to you. The key part is that you have taken the time to develop online relationships with colleagues, mentors, and many others who might be able to help you learn something useful. Doesn’t always have to be about teaching, just something you might want to know.
  4. You share your life with colleagues you’ve never met. You take selfies on vacation and share them not only with your family and friends – but with online colleagues you’ve never actually met in person. You love sharing your life and adventures with them!
  5. Your weekly schedule involves twitter chats. You know when you need to be by a computer or smartphone so you can monitor #edchat or your other favorite hashtag chat. It lets you learn on the go!
  6. Summer breaks means ISTE and other conferences. As soon as the final bell rings, you don’t race to the nearest beach! You make sure your bags are packed and ready for a few can‘t-miss conferences where all your online colleagues and friends are going.
  7. You know the vocabulary. It’s a lot like a second language. You know terms like 1:1, BYOD, PLN, Personalized Learning, Flipped, and decamp.
  8. You turn to colleagues in other countries when in need. You have a great group of colleagues in the building but they’re also quite busy and may not have the answers to all your questions. They’re only human. So you’ve networked and built a group of online contacts you can turn to when you need an answer 24-7. They are all around the world so you never know who will be awake and able to answer your call for help!
  9. You’re a digital citizen. First, you know what being a proper ‘digital citizen‘ means. You know it’s critically important that you treat others with respect, know what cyber-bullying is, act in a positive manner, and are trying to always be a useful member of your community. This isn’t as easy as it sounds. Trolls and many others can distract and provoke you. But you are smart enough to not take the bait. And so are your students.
  10. You’re always hungry to learn, try, and tinker with new tech. Every new Apple announcement is a special time. A new Android update means your lunch hour just got booked up. When any new education technology movement is made, you are always ready to try out a new app, test a web tool, read an e-book, or just take some time to tinker!

via DailyGenius

10 Rules to Improve Your Presentations

10 Rules to Improve Your Presentations

  1. No Bullet Points. Bullet points ruin presentations. When you use bullet points, you take away from your talent as a speaker and reduce your meeting or presentation to a read-aloud session. Bullets work great in reports and documents, but keep them out of your presentations.
  2. Start on Paper. PowerPoint is a great tool, but starting your presentations on the computer will only box you into the templates that Microsoft and your company has created. Instead, grab a couple pieces of paper and a stack of sticky notes. Treat each sticky note as a slide and write the overall idea on each slide needed on a sticky note. Then peel and place them on the paper until you have a solid presentation outline that tells your story.
  3. The 30pt Rule. Your audience does not have super-human vision. When you use text on your slides, use a font size no smaller than 30pt. Any smaller, and your audience won’t be able to read the text on your slides.
  4. No Starburst. What is a starburst? When you think about it, it’s really just a crazy circle that serves no purpose. When we refer to this rule, a better way to think about it is to make sure your slides are simple. Don’t use crazy shapes or clip art in an effort to “jazz up” your slides. Instead, think about what you can delete from your slide to make sure the message you are trying to communicate is clear.
  5. Time-limits, Not Slide-limits. Does your company ask for “3 slides” for meetings? When you’re only allowed a set number of slides, it can lead you to break all our above rules. Ask your manager to change the slide limit to a time limit. In a three-minute presentation, some presenters may use 20 slides or even more. By setting a time limit and not a slide limit, organizations can empower employees to give better presentations.
  6. 1 Thought Per Slide. Presentations give you the opportunity to tell your story and sell your ideas. When a slide is packed with five different ideas, your story is lost. When you are looking through your slides, make sure they only communicate one idea per slide.
  7. No Noise. Glance at a slide for a couple of seconds. Do you understand clearly what the slide is about? If you do not, then it likely has too much noise. Keeping slides simple is one of the most important steps you can take in making great presentations.
  8. No Logo on Every Slide. If you are 20 minutes into a presentation and your audience doesn’t know who you are and what company you are with, then you have a major problem. The problem isn’t going to be solved by placing your company logo on every slide in your presentation. These logos add extra noise and distract from the story you are trying to tell.
  9. No Chart Junk. Your presentation was likely not created for an academic class. Don’t fill it with complex charts that will take your audience a minute or more to determine the data point you are trying to emphasize. Make your data clear. If you are going to use a chart, make sure its takeaway is clear. Remember that, sometimes, posting a single stat on a slide can have more of an impact than an elaborate chart you plucked out of a pivot table./li>
  10. Tell a Story. The first nine rules all support this one. As a presenter, your job is to tell a story. Make sure your presentations – both slides and speech – work together to tell a clear story. It should consist of essential story elements like conflict and humor. Tell a story!

via pinfographics