Instructional Designers’ Roles

The-Many-Different-Roles-of-an-Instructional-Designer-Infographic
Click here to enlarge | Source: e-Learning Infographics

The Instructional Designers’ Roles Infographic shows that the instructional designer is part engineer, part architect, part artist, and part craftsman. It definitely entails a lot of flexibility or the ability to balance roles. What other roles would you suggest be added to this diagram? Feel free to leave a comment with your ideas!

Here are a few other resources related to instructional design that you might find helpful.

How To Write Engaging Questions for Online Discussion Forums

Online asynchronous discussions are often incorporated by faculty into blended or online courses, providing opportunities for rich dialog among students outside of the traditional face-to-face classroom environment. A number of steps can be taken to promote an engaging and interactive online discussion, beginning with drafting the discussion questions that students are asked to respond to. This infographic highlights a variety of suggestions that can yield more meaningful and deeper online discussions.

How to Write Engaging Questions for Online Forums Infographic
Source: BangTheTable

For students in my summer course, ETT 511, you may in particular find these tips helpful as you draft the discussion questions for the week your group facilitates.

What additional suggestions do you have for writing engaging questions for online discussion forums?  Feel free to leave a comment with your ideas!

7 Learning Principles To Create Online Courses

Geri E. McArdle, in his book Training Design and Delivery, encourages training professionals to become familiar with 7 principles and them in their delivery of education. These principles certainly also apply to online instruction:

  1. Part or Whole Learning
  2. Spaced Learning
  3. Active Learning
  4. Feedback
  5. Overlearning
  6. Primacy and Recency
  7. Transfer of Learning

Creating-Online-Courses-Based-On-The-7-Principles-of-Learning-Infographic
Source: e-Learning Infographics

Additional commentary on these 7 principles is available here.

5 Ways Online Learning Improves Education

Why-Online-Learning-Is-Vital-to-Improving-Education
Click here to enlarge | Source: Find more e-Learning Infographics

This info graphic above presents five ways on how online learning improves educational productivity.

  1. Increase access to educational resources and experiences
  2. Engage students in active learning with materials and resources
  3. Individualize and differentiate instruction based on student performance
  4. Personalize learning by building on student interests
  5. Make better use of student and teacher time by automating routine tasks

In what other ways do you believe that online learning improves education? Feel free to leave a comment with your ideas!

Google Announces New Learning Management System

Google ClassroomClassroom is a new, free tool coming to Google Apps for Education that helps teachers easily and quickly create and organize assignments, provide feedback, and communicate with their classes” (Source). “Classroom weaves together Google Docs, Drive and Gmail to help teachers create and organize assignments quickly, provide feedback efficiently, and communicate with their classes with ease…it lets students organize their work, complete and turn it in, and communicate directly with their teachers and peers” (Source).

The following video highlights the experiences of some of the teachers and students who provided feedback as Google developed Classroom.

Benefits for Classes

Easy to Set up

Teachers can add students directly or share a code with their class to join. It takes just minutes to set up.

Saves Time

The simple, paperless assignment workflow allows teachers to create, review, and grade assignments quickly, all in one place.

Improves Organization

Students can see all of their assignments on an assignments page, and all class materials are automatically filed into folders in Google Drive.

Enhances Communication

Classroom allows teachers to send announcements and questions instantly. Since students can post to the stream, they can help out their classmates.

Affordable and Secure

Like the rest of our Google Apps for Education services, Classroom contains no ads, never uses your content or student data for advertising purposes, and is free for schools.

For more info or to request an invite to Google Classroom, visit http://www.google.com/edu/classroom

While I agree with Joshua Kim that this announcement by Google focused on K-12 education has little direct impact immediately on higher education, providing an increasing number of elementary and secondary students access to LMS-type technologies has the potential to further grow the expectations of students when they arrive at the postsecondary level for faculty to effectively make use of online technologies in their teaching. And, any additional competition in the online educational technology space will only help spur future innovation.

What is your response to this latest announcement by Google? Are you planning on requesting an invite? Will there be interest by teachers at your school to try Google Classroom? Leave a comment with your thoughts!